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At the Longwill School for the Deaf in Birmingham, England, students study in both British Sign Language (BSL) and English. According to a Futurelab article, they communicate in these two very different languages with the help of PlayStation Portables.

Last year, the school borrowed some units from the Birmingham East City Learning Centre; the deputy head thought that, among other things, the PSP would be good for teaching sign language to the students’ hearing siblings. For instance, an instructor could make sign language videos for the kids to play on their systems, and the kids could practice by signing into their PSPs’ integrated video cameras. The PSP has also become a portable notebook for the school’s pupils. BSL and English have completely different grammars and sentence structures, and written English is still focused on how words sound. (For a more in-depth analysis of the problems deaf people can have with written English, see What Really Matters in the Early Literacy Development of Deaf Children).

What does the Sony PSP have to do with English literacy? Teachers giving writing assignments can ask students to do a draft of their work by making a video in sign with their PSPs’ cameras; then, when they bring their PSPs back to school, they can work on English translation with the teacher’s help. As Longwill’s deputy head Allison Carter says, “[English writing is] becoming much more manageable for the children and you’re getting a much higher quality of work because they can reflect in their first language.” To see more about how Longwill is using technology in the classroom, including images of PSPs in action, see Nathan Monk’s Design Diary.

In related (if much older) news, you can turn your PSP into a portable Teletype (TTY) device.

(Cross posted to GameCritics.com).

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